Organizing: April 2011 Archives



"It's much more like Egypt then MoveOn", is the comparison Roberto Lovato used to describe how migrant youth use social media as we prepared for our panel in the National Conference for Media Reform here in Boston.  It's an apt comparison, I believe.  Unauthorized migrant youth, or Dreamers (after the DREAM Act), have had to use social media differently then most in the U.S.  

This for two major reasons, I believe: (1) because of the widespread political violence, now escalated by the Obama administration, which has been unleashed on our communities (Yes, I count myself as being in community with migrant youth, as we all should), and (2) because only a few years ago there was not a single media outlet you could find that truly gave voice to undocumented youth.  What has sprouted up in resistance to that violence and systemic silence is truly unique, I believe, and it's good to see social media behemoths like Mashable start to recognize it.
The idea of coming out, of being undocumented and unafraid and now unapologetic, has become a national movement in great part due to the Immigrant Youth Justice League.  Keep it up herman@s:

Undocumented and Unafraid

[Ed.: In my inbox from TheDreamIsComing]:

Press Advisory
Contact: Juan Escalante | Cell: 407-602-8675 | Email: Juan@dreamactivist.org

7 undocumented youth 'come out' at Hurt Park and share testimonies

Atlanta, Georgia- In what is the first time something like this has happened in Georgia, 7 undocumented youth, 'come out' of the shadows to share their stories. The youth are participating in this action as a part of a larger national campaign asking undocumented youth to step up, shed their fears, and speak out as being undocumented and unafraid.

Georgina Perez, an undocumented young person is coming out because, she says: "I am tired of living in fear; I am tired of being constantly told I cannot do something just because of my status. I was brought to this country over 18 years ago, when I was just 3. I am a proud Georgian, I want to contribute to this nation and I will not let anyone tell me how to live my life. I am no longer afraid."

On Tuesday Georgina will be joined by 6 other undocumented youth in 'coming out' and declaring their status: Dayanna Rebolledo, David Ramirez, Andrea Rosales, Viridiana Martinez, Jose Rico Benavides, and Maria Marroquin.

All of the youth are members of The Dream is Coming project - www.thedreamiscoming.com. Some of their previous actions have resulted in the arrest of undocumented youth. "It is time for those against us to decide which side they are on. As undocumented youth we are no longer going to stand by while our rights are taken away," says Mohammad, an undocumented youth arrested last May while staging a sit-in at the Tucson offices of Sen. John McCain.

According to a July 2010 Migrant Policy Institute report, Georgina is just one of the estimated 74,000 undocumented youth who are currently living in Georgia. She joins the over 2.1 million who reside in the United States.

When: Tuesday, April 5th at 1:30pm
Where: Hurt Park, corner of Gilmer Street SE & Courtland Street SE
What: Undocumented youth come out of the shadows and demand their rights.

###

As TheDreamisComing, we are compelled by our frustration and the fierce urgency of our dreams to act as agents of our destinies and be the catalysts for a future in which we are empowered, mobilized, and living with the dignity we deserve. We are a group of undocumented youth who have worked for years on a path to legalization. We are at a point in our movement where radical action has become necessary for ourselves and our communities.

About this Archive

This page is a archive of entries in the Organizing category from April 2011.

Organizing: March 2011 is the previous archive.

Organizing: May 2011 is the next archive.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.




XOLAGRAFIK Designs