Migrant Youth: August 2012 Archives

I'm writing now to provide my assessment of the government's Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals process (DACA) as it unfolds.  Back in June, I wrote about my doubts about DACA based on the Obama administration's record of empty promises to the immigrant community.  While we still don't know for sure how this program is going to play out--no one has a work permit in their hand yet--developments since June 15 have been encouraging.  

Don't read this post if you are looking for detailed guidance on how to apply for DACA.  The most comprehensive guidance is on the USCIS.gov (U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services) website:
  • FAQ
  • Form I-821D, with related forms and instructions  
    (if the links are dead, do an internet search for "Form I-821D" or "deferred action for childhood arrivals USCIS").

If you have specific questions about the application process, read the FAQ or consult with an immigration attorney.  If you have ever been arrested or had any contact with the criminal justice or immigration systems (including being stopped at the border, even if you were a child), consult with an attorney.  The government will likely end up deporting some applicants who have criminal convictions that disqualify them for DACA.

On August 3, USCIS issued additional guidance about the process, which they clarified again over the past week in the FAQ.  Here are some highlights: