Recently in Harvard Category

UPDATE: CREDO Action just sent an action alert out to 15,000 people in Massachusetts regarding Rep. Fattman. 800 People have already signed.

For the first time I can remember, as long as I've been a resident of Massachusetts, local Republican leadership has been silent on the issue of unauthorized migration.  It appears State Representative Ryan Fattman (R-Sutton), has finally crossed a line too far by suggesting that undocumented rape victims "should be afraid to come forward" in the Worcester Telegram & Gazette.  Over 100 people have signed my petition asking that Mass. GOP Leadership clarify their position on undocumented rape victims, and almost 500 people have signed a petition started by local women's rights group, New Hope, Inc., asking the Mass. State Assembly to censure Rep. Fattman. If you haven't signed my petition, yet, please do so:


Massachusetts Republicans love to beat up on the pro-migrant community. The entire Republican infrastructure, along with local conservative newspapers like the Boston Herald, and talk radio like WRKO AM 680, beat up on us so much it's hard to know which punches to defend. Folks who follow me know that I don't say that as a partisan. In fact, I think it's partly the pro-migrant community's fault that we've allowed ourselves to be punching bags for Republicans, and the first ones to be sold out by a state that is run almost entirely by Democrats. We're not as well organized as we should be, but you can help us start to build the power we need to take on this nativist infrastructure.

As the pro-migrant community tries to build power here in Massachusetts, we have the gift of a rare misstep by the miniscule Republican caucus, through Rep. Fattman's remarks, to shine the light of truth on the horrific anti-migrant policies that local Republicans advocate for and local Democrats enable. I wouldn't be pushing this if Rep. Fattman had apologized. However, it's clear from his "clarifying" statement (which doesn't do much clarifying),and the silence of Republican leaders, that they are refusing to take responsibility for his statements. Rep. Fattman's statements discourage undocumented rape victims from coming forward, and encourage rapists to focus on undocumented women.

As I stated in my first post about this, this isn't an attempt to play political games, nor is this a hypothetical situation. Unauthorized migrants are frequently preyed on by people who know they're too afraid to go to the police. Furthermore, this situation gets to the heart of the debate that advocates are having over what I think is currently the greatest threat that migrant communities face across the nation, the [In]Secure Communities program (S-Comm).


It's taken me much too long to do this.  Better late than never. 

People have been asking me for these stories ever since our coming out event at Harvard on March 10, 2010.  Through Harvard College Act on a Dream, we were able to secure permission to publish three of the anonymous stories we read, publicly.  Here are the links to the stories I just published on Citizen Orange:

  1. Anonymous Undocumented Harvard Student #1
  2. Anonymous Undocumented Harvard Student #2
  3. Anonymous Undocumented Harvard Student #3
To get a better sense of where these students are coming from, I recommend you read Elizabeth Pezza's excellent piece in the Harvard Crimson on living in the shadows at Harvard, which I reviewed here
This story was read on March 10, 2010, during our coming out event at Harvard.

Harvard, Class of 2009

Teachers, counselors, administrators, community members, and elected officials ... You, ALL OF YOU, LIED to me.
 
Every time you told me "hard work pays off," every time you said, "if you try your best, you can succeed," and every time you advised me, "believe in yourself and you can make all your dreams come true," you LIED to me.
This story was read on March 10, 2010, during our coming out event at Harvard.

Harvard, Class of 2009

Every great story begins with something about the self-evident human right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. I hope that one day my story will too, begin this way.

For now, all I have is a story about perseverance in the face of adversity; about patience through insurmountable frustrations; about a life full of hope, and about the dreams that someday will not only have to be just dreams.
This story was read on March 10, 2010, during our coming out event at Harvard

Harvard, Class of 2010

My parents met in the local pharmacy of a small town in El Salvador.  Four years later, I was born.  At the time, my older brother was a toddler.  It was also the same time that my father began his journey to the north - out of necessity - because he wanted a better life for out family. 

I don't remember seeing my dad more than a handful of times as I was growing up.  The cardboard silhouette of father and son I made in school for Fathers' Day always went undelivered. Despite this, there was always food on our table, payments for school, and toys on Christmas.
I was just informed about this last night.  The Harvard Crimson and the Boston Globe are reporting that a student at the Harvard Divinity School, Nur Munir, has been detained.  The Harvard Crimson Editorial Board has already come out in support of Munir and is asking Harvard to take a more active role to help him finish his education.  Harvard Act on a Dream hope's to address Munir's detention during a rally, today.  I will update this post as I receive more information.

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