Global Citizen: April 2008 Archives

There are a couple of events coming up soon for those in the New York metro area who want to make their voices heard to convince America to repeal our draconian immigration laws and give migrants a fair shake.

The May 1 rally at Union Square is the place to go for all your 2008 migration protest needs.

And there is a new documentary on the migration debate in the U.S. that looks very promising--free screening before the rally on May 1.

But first, a vigil on April 26 to promote passage of the Child Citizen Protection Act (CCPA) (details on all these events below).

In the “credit where due” file, we have the NY Times picking up on the connection between the papal visit and the Pilgrim’s Pride raids.  I complained a few days ago about the absence of coverage of the fact that even as Bush was welcoming one of the foremost advocates for immigrants in the world to the White House last week, federal immigration agents were locking up migrants and breaking up families in widescale coordinated raids around the country.  

The story broadly covered some of the pope’s remarks on immigration:

Even as he was flying to the United States, Pope Benedict XVI spoke of protecting immigrant families, not dividing them.

He raised the issue again in a meeting on Wednesday with President Bush, and later that day spoke in Spanish to the church’s “many immigrant children.” And when he ends his visit to New York on Sunday, he will be sent off by a throng of the faithful, showing off the ethnic diversity of American Catholicism.

The choreography underscores the importance to the church here of its growing diversity — especially its increasing Hispanic membership.

Of the nation’s 65 million Roman Catholics, 18 million are Latino, according to the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life, and they account for more than two-thirds of the new Catholics in the country since 1960.

. . .

The separation of families “is truly dangerous for the social, moral and human fabric” of Latin and Central American families, the pope told reporters aboard his plane. “The fundamental solution is that there should no longer be a need to emigrate, that there are enough jobs in the homeland, a sufficient social fabric,” he said. Short of that, families should be protected, not destroyed, he said. “As much as it can be done it should be done,” the pontiff said.